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Posts from the ‘Friends & Family’ Category

December 28, 2016   

Travels with Wesley: The Photo Journal

After going through many thousands of images, I’ve compiled a couple different photo journals about my life with Wesley. Check out the new webpage with links to a few nice stories and movies, and the larger “Best of Wesley” and “Travels with Wesley” photo albums on Flickr.

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January 15, 2016   

Holiday Road Trip

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I took a road trip from Austin, Texas to the Bay Area, California over the Holidays, and ended up spending a few weeks skiing and hanging out in Lake Tahoe. Along the way, I was able to visit with some good friends and family in San Francisco, Mammoth Lakes, Sacramento and Downieville, and my friend Amanda came down to Lake Tahoe to visit for a few days.

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October 24, 2015   

My Heritage

Heritage sailboat on Elliot Bay in Seattle, WA

I just bought this sailboat! That’s my grandfather, Captain Andy, in the blue jacket and cap sailing alongside Howie Renner in about 1967 on Elliot Bay in Seattle. My grandfather designed the boat and Renner built many of them. It’s called a Heritage, and this was the very first one ever made. I went sailing on it as a little kid. The boat is on the gulf coast of Florida with the Renner family. I’ll be driving out to pick it up in mid November and bringing it to Austin. Let me know if anyone wants a ride! More info on the Heritage class of sailboats can be found on this website my dad put together: http://www.davidhazy.org/andpph/HERITAGE/

I’ll add more pictures and updates very soon!

July 23, 2014   

Wesley

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Wesley and I were walking with a girlfriend of ours on an old cobbled sea wall that extended far into the waters off the coast of Maine. It was early 2007, I think, and the wall stood steep above the water a good 6-10 feet. The surrounding harbor was dotted with rich sailboats and buoyed lobster traps, all gently bobbing up and down with the ocean waves and our unhurried stroll. It was the kind of setting you’d read about in books and imagine if you were so romantic. My friend and I were holding hands and enjoying our conversation, while Wesley followed behind, raced ahead, fell back, raced ahead, and so on.

Wes has always had a penchant for wandering off, curious with everything and everybody. A trait I celebrate, but one that often left me shaking my head. He shared my ability to get into mischief no matter how difficult the mischief was to achieve. In this moment, given the width and confined length of the sea wall, I was relaxed in the knowledge that he could roam free, but not far. And this is how we spent some time that day.

Fully present in the hand and moment that we were all having, I was suddenly startled by the loud splash I heard behind me. I didn’t see Wes in front of me, or behind me, instead surprised to find the source of the splash was him. Hundreds of yards from shore, Wes had jumped on his own into the cold ocean below. He was swimming with great intent, and was heading… straight… for… a large orange buoy, with lobster trap below.

After my initial shock at his daring it occurred to me what he was doing. I became more proud than worried. He wanted lobster, and why shouldn’t he want lobster?! My friend was horrified and very concerned. My reaction was conflicted. I was like, “Wes, come back!” “No, get it!” “Come back!” “Go get it, Wes!” The water was cold and there was no apparent way to get to him. I’m happier in the belief that he knew there was lobster attached to that buoy. I could think of no other reason why he would dive after it. Tennis balls are yellow, and much, much smaller.

When Wes made it to the nearest buoy, maybe 20 feet out, he dunked his head beneath the water to grab the base and thick rope in his mouth. He was fervently paddling and trying to pull it. Two problems I saw: 1. That trap was heavy and it wasn’t budging. And 2) Where did he intend to take it? It was a long way to shore, and the sea wall was almost completely vertical. I don’t think he thought the whole thing through. He wanted lobster, so he just jumped.

Wesley swam and swam, more determined than I have ever seen him. He snorted in the waves, splashed with his strokes, and stayed focused on swimming back to somewhere not water—to somewhere he could bask in the accomplishment. I was clinging to the side of the wall, nearest I could get to the surface. I was congratulating him, encouraging him, and begging him to swim to me. This went on for some time and I too started to worry a bit. I reluctantly encouraged him to let go, leave it, and come back. Though he finally did, it was not without completely going for it with everything that he had. He swam to me, cold and disappointed, and we both scaled back up the side of the wall to my worried friend looking on. With the concern set aside, she was now shaking her head incredulously at the Davidhazy boys.

I was very proud of Wes that day, and every day since. Though he passed away today, I am very happy with the 14 years we’ve spent together traveling hundreds of thousands of miles around North America. He was a good friend to so many wonderful people, and they to him. In that way, I am no different.

So many people seem to be just like their dogs, but not me. He represented everything that I would wish for myself; genuine kindness, unconditional love, social exuberance, and no patience for feeling sorry for himself. I am at the same time a lesser person without him and also so much better off for the experience of him.

Whenever I just jump, I think of Wes.

Travels with Wesley (pictures)
Dec 2012: 12 Things About My Dog
Feb 2011: My Best Westerman

And here are just a few of his many starring movie roles…

Wes stole the show with his brief role at the beginning of this movie:

May 10, 2014   

Country Roads & Lake Ontario

Spent a couple weeks with dad and Sue in Honeoye Falls, New York. Received a new bicycle and enjoyed the pleasant country roads, and went sailing a few times on the Adria on Lake Ontario.

Dad sailing the Adria on Lake Ontario.

Dad sailing the Adria on Lake Ontario.

 

Sailing the Adria on Lake Ontario. Received my new bicycle in the mail. And Wesley hanging out with the horses.

Sailing the Adria on Lake Ontario. Received my new bicycle in the mail. And Wesley hanging out with the horses.

December 27, 2013   

Home for the Holiday

I was visiting dad and Sue in Honeoye Falls, NY, for the last few days, before heading back to my new home in Chicago. Whenever I come here, which in itself is rare, I am often reminded of a time long since past—a parallel place where everything seems to stand still as I flit about the planet. When I come here, I am also reminded of what a good marriage can look like. Dad did just enough right in his life to deserve Sue.

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December 23, 2012   

Paddling in the Adirondacks

I finally got around to editing a little movie together from my canoe trip this past August. Three friends converged on the Lucky Goat Farm in upstate New York before embarking on a four day paddle around a few lakes in the upper Adirondack Mountains. This movie stars, Eric (the planner), David (the provocateur), and Andy (the photographer). I had a brilliant time and was a highlight of my year.

Music by Jay Farrar & Benjamin Gibbard, Martin Sexton, Bon Iver, and Ryan Adams.

November 3, 2012   

Visit with Tracey to Multnomah Falls, and lunch with David at the Art Institute of Chicago

September 25, 2012   

The Dedicated Professor

my father’s old lab and my home away from home

While I’m so proud of my dad and happy to see his name associated with the lab and facilities he brought to life for more than four decades, this sign also stings. Perhaps very few people know the truth behind his poor treatment by the school and how they so unceremoniously forced him out.

My dad has been a pioneer not just of photo wizardry, but also a pioneer in finding and promoting new ways to foster communication and community across the photo world—always representing the very best that RIT had to offer. He generously helped and enriched the lives of thousands of students and colleagues, never asking for anything in return aside from a warm smile and a few cents for the coffee jar.

He’s far too gracious to admit, but I know it hurt him deeply when his life’s work was undermined by a small minority of back-stabbing ass-kissers and dismissed by the cowardly suits now running the place. It’s a real shame. He and all hard working teachers deserve better.

RIT was my home too, but at least I still got my dad. It’s nice to see him happy again, and see that there are so many people that think he’s pretty cool too.

famous panorama portrait of my dad in his lab

July 23, 2012   

Big time, small package.

While visiting friends in Los Angeles this past week, I took some pictures and built a new website for Tracey Pepper and her successful media training business. She works with lots of big rock stars, writing press releases, bios and coaching them on how to project their best, true selves to the media. We staged a little photo shoot with her and Matt Barber, now a very successful “rock star” editor in his own right. Here’s a few of those pics, and one of BJ Barber (Matt’s better half). Wes and I had a great time.

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Tracey and Matt doing an interview

Tracey’s Freedom tattoo and media training guide

The lovely Bernadette joins me for coffee